NIPPON Kichi - 日本吉

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2007/5/22


うさぎの吊るし飾り Usagi no tsurushi-kazari Rabbit Hanging Ornament

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Hanging ornaments such as these are known as 'tsurushi (hanging) kazari' or 'tsurushi hina'. These ornaments have been part of traditional culture since the Edo period, and the custom is rooted in the Izu-Inatori Onsen region. During the Hina (Girls) Festival, parents prayed for their daughter's happiness through a thread taken from a piece of old clothing. It is this hina hanging ornament that swings from both sides of the tiered stand used for the presentation of the hina dolls.
   This custom is called 'sagemon' in Yanagawa, Kyushu, 'kasafuku' in Sakata, Yamagata, and 'hanging hina' in Izu-Inatori. Only these three districts have inherited this historical patrimony, documents and photos.
   People entrust their wishes to the ornament. Some 110 ornaments have separate meanings. For example, the red eyes of a rabbit are supposed to have the power of causing and curing diseases. A rabbit is said to be the servant of a deity.
   It is lots of fun to decorate with ornaments that suit each season. Your favorite small objects will colour your life and enrichen your heart.
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2007/5/15


ゆかた地アロハシャツ YukatagiArohashatsu Wagara-Yukataji Aloha Shirts

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“Wagara-Yukataji Aloha Shirts” made of domestically produced fancy Yukata cloth with traditional Japanese patterns are developed, designed and sold by KANTARO’S. Tsuyoshi Fujii, the owner of the shop, gave the name to the products. A Japanese taste and a Western style are successfully blended, while there are no oversights in every detail. As the cloth sold for Yukata is 40 cm in width, two pieces of cloth are sewed together at the back. Two back tucks are made for easy movement and air permeability. Buttons are made of natural materials, mainly bamboo. The Chest, waistline, sleeve width and armhole opening are made loose. The sleeve is sewed to the sleeve cap and stitches are given on the seam. Before going on sale, the prototypes had been tried on by a lot of people with various body types and improved in the process of trial and error. Mr. Fujii says, “We made efforts to design it so that the front piece won’t be pulled up even when worn by a person with a little potbelly. We are also careful about the patterns of the pockets to fit those on the body pieces. As is explained by Mr. Fujii, there are thoughtful considerations given to cover for our figures.
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2007/5/11


坂 雅子 Ban masako Masako Ban

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Masako Ban is an internationally successful accessory designer. After working at Ban Shigeru Architects she turned her skills to becoming a graphic designer. In 2001, while in London, self taught she started working with accessory design. Upon returning to Japan, she founded her own company, “acrylic”. In 2005, her first collection was selected for the MOMA Design Store in New York, and in November of the same year, she opened her own store also called acrylic in Tokyo. Her work is characterized by simplicity in design, with the materials and finish also playing a very important part in the final product. As can be see